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If modem has no access to wifi unlike router

  1. #1
    Wariat African Astronaut
    so I was reading about the diff between a modem and a router and it seems like modems only get you onlina access viw dialup or ethernet for broadband? While routers (that do not even need modems it seems thus why do ISPs give you both often?) connect you wirelessly to wifi?
    https://www.lifewire.com/difference-between-modem-and-router-4159854

    But what made me ask this question is I saw this old vid from 2001 advertising wireless modems that apparently worked in major metropolitan areas wirelessly? So wtf? Its like they were advertising wireless routers and calling them modems then? How did these things make sense considering wifi didnt exist? They connected to ethernet terminals wt wirports or cell phone 3g or 2g signals. Someone fill me in on this great revolution back then:

  2. #2
    Grylls motherfucker [abrade this vocal tread-softly]
    your isp got you on lockdown
  3. #3
    Obbe Alan What? [annoy my right-angled speediness]
    Maybe you should go serverless?
  4. #4
    Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country Space Nigga [my scoffingly uncritical tinning]
    We had WiFi and Bluetooth in 2001, they just took a while to get popular
  5. #5
    -SpectraL coward [the spuriously bluish-lilac bushman]
    Jesus, kids today are dumb as tree stumps. A router isn't a modem. A router only routes, whereas the modem talks to the Internet. In modern times, the router and modem come together in one single unit.
  6. #6
    Grylls motherfucker [abrade this vocal tread-softly]
    Originally posted by -SpectraL Jesus, kids today are dumb as tree stumps. A router isn't a modem. A router only routes, whereas the modem talks to the Internet. In modern times, the router and modem come together in one single unit.

    lol
  7. #7
    Wariat African Astronaut
    Originally posted by -SpectraL Jesus, kids today are dumb as tree stumps. A router isn't a modem. A router only routes, whereas the modem talks to the Internet. In modern times, the router and modem come together in one single unit.

    But we are talking 2001 here. Why were those devices like this even sold or what were they good for with hardly any wifi hotspots? Why did they call it a modem and not a router?
  8. #8
    Wariat African Astronaut
    I want to understand this video abvoe and the revolution of those gadgets the revolutionary purpose of them.
  9. #9
    Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country Space Nigga [my scoffingly uncritical tinning]
    Originally posted by Wariat But we are talking 2001 here. Why were those devices like this even sold or what were they good for with hardly any wifi hotspots? Why did they call it a modem and not a router?

    You bought the WiFi hotspot, jesus.
  10. #10
    -SpectraL coward [the spuriously bluish-lilac bushman]
    Originally posted by Wariat But we are talking 2001 here. Why were those devices like this even sold or what were they good for with hardly any wifi hotspots? Why did they call it a modem and not a router?

    If you're going to get an answer, your question first has to not be a bunch of third-grade grammatical babble. Learn to speak first, then ask questions.
  11. #11
    -SpectraL coward [the spuriously bluish-lilac bushman]
    When dialup modems first came out, what you would do is wire connect your router to the dialup modem, and then the router would be able to transmit the Internet signal the dialup modem was receiving by wire to other devices, also connected by wire. Eventually, the router became wireless and connected to the dial up modem by way of a wireless card installed inside the PC.
  12. #12
    Wariat African Astronaut
    But they called it a wireless modem not a wireless router like they call the late shit these days. Why if it could connect a device to WiFi? Is it because it was plugged into a PC and not just sitting there like modern lye routers? I mean they both used WiFi right?
  13. #13
    Wariat African Astronaut
    Did u even watch the vid hyping this shot up in 2001?
  14. #14
    Wariat African Astronaut
    Dialup was 90s shit this is the noughties shit.
  15. #15
    -SpectraL coward [the spuriously bluish-lilac bushman]
    Same thing with broadband. You needed to install a wireless card on your PC, which made the connection between the modem and the router.
  16. #16
    Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country Space Nigga [my scoffingly uncritical tinning]
    Originally posted by Wariat Dialup was 90s shit this is the noughties shit.

    I used dialup until 2006.

    At colllege the connection maxed at about 100 kB/s, sometimes as much as 150 kB/s, which was fast.

    I remember being on limewire and the like in college and downloading random files.

    Despite that I never even once downloaded CP, which makes me doubt some of y'all's stories.
  17. #17
    -SpectraL coward [the spuriously bluish-lilac bushman]
    We used to use a technique called "shotgunning" to increase dialup speeds, by installing two 33.6 US Robotics modems and having them run in tandem.
  18. #18
    Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country Space Nigga [my scoffingly uncritical tinning]
    Also the difference between modems and routers is publically available, especially to a tech journalist like OP.
  19. #19
    Wariat African Astronaut
    Originally posted by Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country I used dialup until 2006.

    At colllege the connection maxed at about 100 kB/s, sometimes as much as 150 kB/s, which was fast.

    I remember being on limewire and the like in college and downloading random files.

    Despite that I never even once downloaded CP, which makes me doubt some of y'all's stories.

    A dialup by definition maxes out at 56k so how cna you get 100k from a 56k connection?
  20. #20
    Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country Space Nigga [my scoffingly uncritical tinning]
    Originally posted by Wariat A dialup by definition maxes out at 56k so how cna you get 100k from a 56k connection?

    kB/s or kb/s?
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